Alexander Technique in East Yorkshire

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“The Alexander Technique is making me healthier and more aware”

 

 

This is the 6th interview in a series of interviews with people who have had Alexander Technique lessons. Here are Jocelyn’s answers to a simple set of questions I asked her about the technique.

 

 

 

 

What drew you to the Alexander Technique?

I had heard about it as I am interested in complementary medicine. Also a friend talked about Alexander Technique (AT) and posture. Then an orthopaedic surgeon mentioned my problem was posture related so I looked into AT and found a teacher.

What impact did you hope for by having lessons?

Not a lot

I have been to two teachers and they have both been different

I do Active Rest daily and the directions “ease, space, release” are very helpful (especially ease and space).

I have been reading “The Space Within” by Michael Neill which also helps to be quiet and listen to “space”

I have had over 20 lessons now

AT has helped me release tension in my body. It has got me more interested in the mind-body and how anxiety started off the tension. Conventional medicine cannot help with this.

I believe it is “all about tension” of body, mind and spirit.

I need to relax before any physical pain is to disappear.

 

What difference does ease, space and release make?

I am not sure

I do meditation too.

I felt active rest and the directions were not enough. I needed to relax more which was why I started meditation.

I think I might be overdosing because I could do active rest, meditation and exercise all day.

I have had physiotherapy, exercises, massage, ultrasound, medical acupuncture. It helped and also helped in understanding of chronic pain. However, the benefits did not last.

I like stretching and I am developing my own routine

The Alexander Technique makes me more aware. I notice my pain (when I am out and about) and then I become more body aware (of what I am doing), then I use inhibition (stopping and thinking) then I use directions (neck free, head forward and up)

 

What differences have you noticed through doing the Alexander Technique?

I think there is less pain

I think I can work on the pain

I feel more in control of the pain

I feel more optimistic

It has given me back control – not everyone wants that

 

Was there anything unexpected with having Alexander Technique lessons?

The body awareness

It is like having a massage but it’s not massage

I do see the sessions as lessons, not passive therapy

It is harder than what I thought it would be.

It is contradictory – “You’ve got to think and it’s non-doing”

Directions and non-doing seem different yet are directions “doing”?

I always feel really good when I have a lesson

I didn’t think that thinking about parts of the body can be so relaxing

 

Anything else about “thinking”?

No – Not yet got my head round it

I can incorporate Alexander Technique into everything I do e.g. I use direction and inhibition in exercise

I originally learned to do exercises with tension. I am concentrating on no tension – Alexander Technique has helped

I still do not understand it – this “thinking and not doing”

I am an over-thinker and Alexander Technique says think

I can feel energy – I need to understand it…and yet do I need to understand it?

Alexander Technique fits with energy work

I am less tense with Alexander technique

I think my thinking has changed

I thought  Alexander Technique was posture and now: thinking and the brain = decreased tension

Active rest – brings about a state to do meditation, it is calming and settles my body and mind and I can do exercises in a less tense state

It is changing me

It is making me healthier

I believe it is a way of looking after myself

 

 

 

Interested in having lessons? Contact me?
Jane Clappison MSTAT

01759 307282

https://www.janeclappison.co.uk

Toothache, chicken little, anxiety and the Alexander Technique

I don’t know when I decided not take any notice of TV news. Nor do I remember when I consciously avoided reading the daily papers, but it was before the days of the internet. I imagine I was in my late teens. I just didn’t want to know how bad things were.

As I therefore knew less about the world at large, I marvelled at how my maternal Grandmother kept up with current affairs. One phone call got me up to speed. I am sure it kept her keenly aware into her 90’s and also extremely grumpy.

Despite an aversion to bad news, I did develop a liking for the Scottish Post as they seemed to be more about good-news stories. Their cartoons like the mischievous Oor Wullie and the family life of The Broons made for a  hilarious treat. I  now love a very un-PC paper for its brain teasers and TV guide, but my love of newspapers and bad news in general (isn’t it almost always bad now) and current affairs, ends there.

Maybe you feel this sense that most news reports are bad news?

Nowadays I can’t avoid death, destruction, vandalism, global warming, not global warming, air quality, plastic floating islands, mass extinctions, deforestation, wars, starvation, discrimination and on and on. As a result, I find myself being pulled into a state of irritation and anxiety. Like a nagging tooth pain, for which there is no cure. The internet, and particularly social media, seem to have got to me in ways my paper/TV news avoidance could not. Perhaps a remote cave might help, but I enjoy being in and of the world. So, I can’t avoid knowing some of the heartbreaking news we are bombarded with from all sides, today.

At times I feel like Chicken Little, crying out that the sky is falling in. Except he discovered it wasn’t falling in, and that all was well. My conclusion is that we are finely balanced at a point where we don’t know whether the sky will fall in or not.

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