Alexander Technique in East Yorkshire

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There is an interconnection which influences everything.

This is the last in series of interviews I carried out with people who have had Alexander Technique lessons. This interview is with Sandra who has had both individual lessons and been to group sessions.

Here are Sandra’s answers to a simple set of questions I asked her about her experience of having lessons:

 

What drew you to the Alexander Technique?

I was curious about the technique because I did little bits in a Yoga class and a friend found it useful.

 

What impact did you hope it would have/make?

I was a “head person” and thought my body carried my head around I realised it is not like that and I wanted to explore that.

 

Was there anything expected about learning the Alexander Technique? If so, what was it, and what impact did it have?

I knew it would be about sitting and standing & I did learn about things like that.

 

Was there anything unexpected about learning the Alexander Technique? If so, what was it?

I have discovered moving sometimes feels so right. It’s a feeling that “everything slots into place.”

I have been able to explore the whole idea of feeling which is quite distinct. Before feeling was a distraction, but not now.

I have learned how to move with the body.

Before I was doing something “out there” rather than something coming from inside. It is more mindful.


What impact did learning the Alexander Technique have?

At first stop (inhibition) felt negative, like I was being told STOP because I was doing something wrong. I needed to think about it and give it time, but at first I was avoiding it. It took a while to get to think of “stop” as “nice” not negative. Being in the moment is positive.

I discovered by doing stopping, that half the things I was going to do, I didn’t need to do them.

I was rushing, resenting doing things, and fighting myself whereas now, I can stop, take a deep breath, look out of the window, and actually enjoy what I am doing (even pot washing) and I notice things.


Was there anything else that was unexpected about learning the Alexander Technique? If so, what was it?

“All of it” was unexpected. The whole experience.

The feeling of relaxation is amazing.Anxiety drops away.

Stopping gives me time and space to enjoy being not doing. It feels nice, “like a deep breath and a sigh of release”

Of course I have got to remember to do it. Sometimes it goes out the window.

I did resist stop and semi-supine (I occasionally did it in yoga and AT lessons). I do it now whenever I think of it. “Let the neck be free” is really good. I do that in the car, at the shops. I need to remember my head, but when I think “Let the neck be free” then I feel a release, then it happens through my body “all at once.”

I thought the teacher was going to do it all for me, but discovered I had to do something. It’s a continuous process and I am continually learning.

 

What do you know now?

I can let go of things.

I am beginning to be aware of my body.

The anxiety and rushing are changing and I am enjoying the connection with the body. I was already able to move well, so I don’t think it’s as much about the movement, I don’t have anything wrong with me.

I notice my body affects my moods. That my body is tied into moods. That there is an interconnection which influences everything. That interconnection means I notice more things.


Anything else?

The body mapping (living anatomy about where the joints are) influenced my walking and how I move.

I’ve enjoyed the mixture of 1:1 lessons and group lessons.

In the 1:1 lessons I could explore personal/specific things but in a group I could learn from the experiences of others and from observing how other group members move. Plus, there are things that can be explored in a group that can’t be done on a 1:1, like when we explored what we might do habitually in a crowd/ on a crowded train and then explored how to do it when applying the Alexander Technique.

It’s more than mindful, it’s a feeling in the whole of the body. From feeling tension, to no tension, letting go, lighter and moving easier. I may be quicker too. I am more prepared.

 

If you would like to learn the Alexander Technique and find out how it might help for you, please contact me or give me a ring and book a lesson.

Jane Clappison

Alexander Technique Teacher

01759 307282

www.janeclappison.co.uk

 

“Through learning the Alexander Technique I am able to use my body to maximum potential.”

This is the 10th interview in a series of interviews I carried out with people who have had Alexander Technique (AT) lessons.

This interview is with Dorothy, who is in her mid 70’s, retired, lives with a partner and leads a very full and active life. Dorothy has been having face to face Alexander Technique lessons with me for a few years.

Each time Dorothy comes for a lesson she tells me about something new that the Alexander Technique has helped her with. Since doing this interview, one of the things she told me was that she used to dread filling and emptying the washing machine. She told me the problem wasn’t so much getting down to the washer but getting back up. She used to need to pull herself up on the washer. Now, she doesn’t even need to think about it.

AT has influenced Dorothy’s life profoundly. She no longer rushes through life, ticking off everything on her “to do” list, but instead, experiences the richness of being in the present moment. Here’s her thoughts about that:

I would like to know a little bit about what impact having Alexander Technique (AT) lessons has had for you.

What drew you to the Alexander Technique?

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“The Alexander Technique has been an eye-opener and I wish I had done it sooner.”

This is the 9th interview in a series of interviews I carried out with people who have had Alexander Technique (AT) lessons. This interview is with Tanya (real name changed for confidentiality).

Tanya started out with weekly lessons and gradually spread them out and at the time of our interview was having them monthly. Tanya has also attended two workshops on running.

Here are some of the benefits Tanya told me she gained through learning the Alexander Technique:

Decreased pain

Improved:

sleep,

digestion,

breathing,

posture,

horse riding,

running and

stamina.

Tanya also said she improved mentally, which she did not expect.

 

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“I think the Alexander Technique is a useful tool for balance.”

Road going off into distanceThis is the 8th interview in a series of interviews I carried out with people who have had Alexander Technique lessons. This interview is with Alice, who is a retired health professional living on her own.

Here are Alice’s answers to a simple set of questions I asked her about her experience of having lessons.

Firstly I asked Alice about what drew her to have lessons. She told me that she had experienced a few trips and falls where she injured herself. For example she broke her arm and hurt her back. The falls made her feel down and she had become frightened of walking and felt she had to plan every single journey. Alice also noticed  that her posture had become stooped, especially when she compared it to her friends.

Alice had a taster session, of Alexander Technique and liked the session and the advice given. After a while, Alice decided to have  a course of lessons in the hope it would improve her balance and posture. When we had our chat, Alice thought she had been to about 10 lessons over the course of the year.

I asked Alice what impact did having lessons make? This is what she told me:

  • My balance has improved.
  • Learning the technique helped me enormously with my confidence in walking and I am not frightened of falling over.
  • My walking is also quicker.
  • I see more around me. I have confidence when I am walking. I now know I don’t need to look at the ground immediately in front of me because I have already seen it coming up ahead, and unless a hole suddenly opens up in front of me which is unlikely, it will be just the same as it was up ahead.
  • I am not sure it has changed my posture so much as I have osteoporosis.
  • Alice also added that she thought that AT was simple but that it’s necessary to incorporate it in daily routine

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